EcoFirstArt Blog
Environmentally Friendly Fine Art, Furniture and Lighting.

By the 1940s, Mid-Century modernism had hit its stride. Of a group of early pioneers of talent and initiative, which included Hans Knoll and Jack Lenor Larsen, a great emerging designer was Harvey Probber, born in 1922 in Brooklyn. While still in high school Probber decided to try his hand at furniture design and at 16 sold his first design—a sofa—to Superior Upholstery for $10. Read more …

Mid-Century’s Appeal


by Carol Steffan • July 6, 2017

While Mid-century generally describes the Postwar Era from 1945 to 1965, the definition has grown to include the 1960s through the early 1970s. Encompassing such diverse fields as architecture, furniture and lighting design, mid-century modern style has ascended a steady rise in popularity and created a dedicated following through popular television shows such as cable tv’s Mad Men and websites such as MidCenturyMobler and MotleyLA. Read more …

Sustainable Art Brings More To Your Home


by Janeen Swing • March 31, 2016

I love working with fine artists. I could listen to them talk about their work all day. What’s special about the artists featured at EcoFirstArt is the way they challenge themselves. Our artists put extra restrictions on their work by using only eco-friendly and recycled materials…whether it means limiting a color palette to organic pigments, clay and minerals, confining sculptural material to found objects, painting Read more …

What does “recycled furniture” bring to mind?


by Janeen Swing • February 25, 2016

If you think of Eco-friendly furnishings as funny, quirky or somehow less than beautiful or elegant, then maybe you’ve missed a whole chapter in sustainable design. It’s exploding onto the interior design scene in sneaky and wonderful ways. I dare you to look at any of EcoFirstArt sofas and declare that they “look recycled. While I’m game for anything made from anything, at EcoFirstArt, you Read more …

Keeping Work In The USA


by Janeen Swing • January 29, 2016

While we Americans were busy making money in the ‘80s and paying lip-service to the green movement, our manufacturers got busy shipping more of their craft overseas. The pendulum, I’m happy to say, is now swinging back towards sustainable design. Artisans are taking charge and making furniture their way. And they’re doing it right here at home. I have been encouraged and enriched by the Read more …